Tuesday, July 21, 2009

The Chinoiserie World of Harrison Howard


There is no artist who captures the essence of Chinoiserie more exquisitely than Harrison Howard. What is that essence? Whimsical, joyful, imaginative, playful, exotic, fanciful, and beautiful. Mr. Howard's murals and watercolors have graced stunning homes across the country including the Royal Saudi Embassy residence, the Vanderbilts, the DuPonts, and the Goodyears. He has worked with the interior design firms of McMillen, Inc., Irvine & Fleming, and Parish-Hadley. Feast your eyes on some of his works in the series Chinoiseries and then read my interview with him. His entire portfolio may be viewed on his website here. Original watercolors as well as giclees which are the highest quality limited edition prints of his work are available for purchase. For a look at his Flower People collection, read this previous post of mine on Style Redux.

















Would you mind sending me a few thoughts on 1) how and when you became interested in Chinoiserie, 2) to what you attribute its universal appeal, 3) and your sources of inspiration?

1) I first became interested in chinoiserie when I was about eleven or twelve years old. My father, who was a free lance artist, had a book of designs by Jean Pillement. I had read fairy tales all through my childhood, and Pillement’s designs seemed a great deal like fairy tale illustrations to me. I started looking at things around our house that had some chinoiserie aspect to them and found that there were quite a few. My parents loved antiques, but until then I had never paid much attention to the things in our house.

2) I am not sure that chinoiserie yet has a universal appeal, but it is amazing to me the extent to which chinoiserie as a style has pervaded the design of furniture, fabrics, china, architecture etc., although many people outside the design and art world remain largely unfamiliar with the term and unaware of the extent to which chinoiserie motifs permeate the design of western goods in our own time. I prefer things that way, because I think that trends in design that become over exposed often lead to misuse that contaminates the best qualities that made that genre appealing in the first place. Some of the items I have seen over the years that emulated Diego Giacometti’s plaster and bronze creations stand as a good example for me of that kind of situation.

3) My sources of inspiration for the chinoiserie images that I am now working on stem from literally everything around me. I am inspired by literature, fashion, children’s stories, gardens, architecture, furniture, unusual objects, poems, art movements and many individual artists and illustrators, just about anything in short. When I first started painting chinoiserie subjects I stuck to the usual conventions largely established in the 18th century in Europe, and I thought purely in terms of light hearted, highly decorative, entertaining schemes. It gradually occurred to me that chinoiserie could be used like any other genre to explore an endless number of ideas and themes, and that the imaginary aspects of chinoiserie as a style defy limitations. It still surprises me that much of the design world has stuck rigidly to using chinoiserie motifs in the context in which they were first conceived. While chinoiserie may seem a very unlikely vehicle, I see it as a genre that has the potential to express everything from absurdities and light humor to almost any aspect of society or individual human behavior. There is a lot of room left for thought provoking work within the genre. Its highly decorative and imaginative possibilities offer innumerable opportunities for inventive color combinations, patterns, and compositions. I think chinoiserie will undoubtedly remain a fairly narrow genre, but for my particular set of interests and objectives, it is an entire realm waiting to be explored.


22 comments:

Averill said...

Great interview, Beth! I love Howard's work.

PrimeTimeMom said...

So beautiful and whimsical! I like the generous size of his originals at 13 3/4 x 19 1/4.

Style Redux 2 said...

Averill-Glad you are a fan-I think you need a piece for the new house.

Style Redux 2 said...

PrimeTimeMom-A good point-one piece framed would make quite a statement.

Mademoiselle Frou-Frou said...

i just LOVE that top picture!!!
you always find the best!
xox
www.froufroufashionista.blogspot.com

Theresa Cheek said...

Very timely post Beth! Will help me with an upcoming project....you make me look good by compiling his works at my fingertips! Thank you!!!

Style Redux 2 said...

Alison-The first one is one of my favorites because it says Les Chinoiseries.

Style Redux 2 said...

Theresa-Glad to help!

Karin said...

Thank you so much for this interesting post. My mother gave me two of Mr. Howard's giclees as a gift last Christmas. She ordered the giclees via the Internet and was pleasantly surprised when Mr. Harrison called her at home to ensure that he had the order right and that the giclees would be going to my house and not to hers. She said he was very personable and absolutely charming. My mom gave me The Butterfly Keeper and The Crab Painter and they are just stunning. The colors are vivid and much more beautiful in person than what you see in the Internet images. When I first opened the packaged prints, it took my breath away to look at them and I continue to have the same reaction several months later. I know I'm gushing, but it's rare today to find something that just so exceeds your expectations. I'm even giving my seven-year-old daughter a framed print in the Flower People series to hang in her bedroom. Love his work!

Kitty said...

Flower People!!! This was such a great post. Made my day!

Style Redux 2 said...

Karin-Thanks for your comment about Harrison's work. He is indeed such a charming and talented man. The two you received are two of my favorites. The idea of one of his pieces for a girl's room is a natural-especially Flower People. I was thinking yesterday about how great any of the Chinoiseries collection would look in a sophisticated nursery with crib linens with chopstick monograms.

Style Redux 2 said...

Kitty-So glad you like his work.

A Gift Wrapped Life said...

His work is incredible! Love the colours and detail and the Chinoiserie style of course.

Style Redux 2 said...

Sande-Gorgeous!

Dumbwit Tellher ♥ said...

One word & one alone, "Unbelievable"!

Style Redux 2 said...

Dumbwit Tellher-Amen!

Alicia said...

An exquisite pick me up!!!
There's a fairy tale quality to his work that just whispers...baby's nursery to me.

Style Redux 2 said...

Alicia-It would be lovely.

annechovie said...

It's great to hear the deeper thoughts/meaning behind Harrison's work. More than meets the eye. Thanks for the interview, Beth. well done. His work is so precise and unique - truly one-of-a-kind.

Style Redux 2 said...

Anne-I know you are a big fan of his. So glad you enjoyed the post.

Seaside Studio said...

Harrison's work is fabulous! I agree with Karin when she says the internet photos do not do them justice. The colors and details are even more wonderful in person.

Style Redux 2 said...

Seaside Studio-So glad you are a fan of this wonderful artist.