Monday, August 31, 2009

Chinoiserie Meissen


This antique Meissen Chinoiserie Porcelain Female Pagoda Nodder pictured above is a fascinating piece currently being auctioned on eBay. On this piece, the head, tongue, and two hands move. Meissen was the first European hard-paste porcelain developed in 1708 by Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus. After his death that year, it was continued and brought to market in 1710 by Johann Friedrich Bottger at Meissen, near Dresden. Before then, porcelain, a highly valuable export, had been perfected only by the Chinese. These Nodding Pagodas date from the 1720s and 1730s. They are extremely rare and valuable because they were produced for a short time when Meissen was slavishly copying models from east Asia before they developed their own unmistakable style. Nodders were used to let people know if an earthquake was starting, because even a slight tremor caused the moving parts to react. You must check out the video of this "first bobblehead."








15 comments:

annechovie said...

I had no idea these existed! Very interesting, Beth.

Elise said...

Hello - I had to leave a note for your to say how wonderful your blog is and how much I've enjoyed reading your posts. They are creative, interesting and unique - and your photo's are divine too ! Best wishes and thank you for sharing them ...

Helen said...

Why are some of them half dressed, and what are the scary faces about? Are they to suggest that an earthquake is on its way? I do like the designs on the clothes, but don't quite understand the rest of the it.

Sanity Fair said...

Really interesting research - what's the standard value on these?

Averill said...

Fascinating; I had no idea these were used as earthquake alerts!

Theresa Cheek said...

Two words that I would not normally put together....Had no idea Meissen made these. Thanks for the great photos.

Style Redux 2 said...

Anne-I thought they were so interesting.

Style Redux 2 said...

Elise-Thank you so much for your comments and thanks for stopping by.

Style Redux 2 said...

Helen-I am not an expert, but I believe the model was a popular version of a Buddha with a big belly and open robe and the facial expression is because of the need for movement of the tongue.

Style Redux 2 said...

Sanity Fair-Because of the rarity, the value can be in excess of $10,000, but this of course depends on age and condition.

Style Redux 2 said...

Averill-Isn't that interesting!

Style Redux 2 said...

Theresa-I'm sure these will be a new discovery for most people-very interesting.

soodie :: said...

Crazy fascinating.

Style Redux 2 said...

Soodie-It is that.

Mrs.McCreary said...

My mom and dad had one of these (among many antiques) as I was growing up. I have the one I grew up looking at now, and love it--no matter the cost/value. It is truly even more amazing to look at in person than the photos give credit.